Traveling With Dogs, Glorious Italy

by Mary Haight on September 18, 2011

The Palazzo Cavalli-Franchetti in Venice, Ital...

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Traveling with dogs to Venice (yes, they are allowed in the gondolas!), in and around the small towns in the Dolomite mountain range, hiking through snow, and then on to Milan, Diane Silver, PR consultant and writer at To Dog With Love, explains how she found traveling with dogs in Italy to be a carefree, almost festive experience with her Havanese, Cosmo.

I was enchanted to hear about the beautiful dog park in a park in Rome complete with a restaurant where you can take your dog inside and have a meal.  There are almost no restrictions on where you can go with your dog in Italy! I was surprised to hear that even shopping was not an issue. I’ve always worried about leaving my dog in the hotel with a stranger in a strange place, and Italy seems to erase that concern. People there are very aware of dog safety and proximity to others, making traveling with dogs in an unfamiliar city where you don’t really know the laws, or maybe even the language, all the more relaxing.

Manners are taken seriously, and that was a happy fact shared in Edie Jarolim’s interview with Diane Silver.  It’s just as important when traveling with dogs to know the dog culture of  a country, or at least the city you will be visiting, as it is to know the culture’s customs when you travel.

Traveling With Dogs – A Little Nitty Gritty

Traveling with dogs overseas means paperwork. While this can sometimes take considerable effort, Italy streamlines the paperwork process. It is easier to travel to Italy with dogs than to return home to the US with them! Be sure to reserve your seat early on international flights in the US.  Only so many dogs are allowed to fly in-cabin on any flight and carrier size and weight limits vary.  Check requirements for traveling with dogs on  all foreign airlines you may use during your vacation before you leave.  And don’t forget to get your dog’s International Health Certificate.

I enjoyed remembering my travels there and as Diane shared her stories, I imagined what it would be like to go with Tashi;)  Pop over to Animal Cafe and listen to Edie Jarolim’s interview – what a wonderful day to do some armchair traveling with dogs!

 

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8 comments
 maison location espagne
maison location espagne

Love the blog..!! Quite valuable and informational. Italy- romantic city, desperate to visit there. Thanks for the wonderful tips. Traveling with dog or leaving him at home were the questions striking my mind all the time. Cleared out all the confusions now. :)

Lynda
Lynda

We just found your blog and LOVE IT. We'll be adding you to our reader and to our Blog Roll over at whitedogblog.com :)

Chris
Chris

Is there anything else needed for taking the dog into Europe, besides the international health certificate and microchip? I am planning to go in Germany in the following months, and I'm curious what else do I need.

MaryHaight
MaryHaight

Ha! I was in the Foreign Service division of the State Department and worked for the Ambassador at the Embassy on Boltzmanngasse. I used to drive to the Oesterreichischer Hof (sorry, no umlaut) on Sundays for my version of brunch, feed the ducks afterwards, take a walk and drive back to Vienna. Great memories;) I would frequent a neighborhood place for dinner once a week and they always allowed people to have their dogs and the dogs were always quiet and sat under the table - of course if they were small, ihre schaetze was treated with an occasional lift onto the lap for a bit of pork hock or whatever. As the waiter scurried over, the dog went back onto the floor:( But that was a fun game! Thanks for the trip down memory lane, Heidi!

Heidi
Heidi

In many European countries, e.g., Austria, dogs are also allowed in restaurants & bars. When we were in Rome and Naples last year, a tour guide told us that Italy has a vast population of stray dogs. Pompeii was apparently so overran with packs of dogs that EU moneies created a safe zone for them close by (providing spays and neuters and adoption of dogs there).

MaryHaight
MaryHaight

Hi and welcome Lynda - nice to "meet" you and glad you're enjoying the blog=)

MaryHaight
MaryHaight

Hi Heidi! I remember how great some countries Europe were for dogs when I lived in Vienna decades ago and even then well behaved dogs (and they were all well behaved) were always allowed. it seems to have just gotten better.from a traveler's pov. I had heard news a couple of years ago about packs of wild dogs in Italy that were causing health and possibe personal safety problems. Thanks so much for catching me up on that!

Heidi
Heidi

Hi Mary, You lived in Vienna! ('Da musst Du auch Deutsch sprechen!?") I grew up by and studied in Salzburg, but part of my family lives / studied there. What did you do there? When I studied, a guy even came into our favorite bar (it was close to the university, and student life was good and exhausting on all sort of levels :-) with his rat on his shoulder. It was unusual, but the rat was safe (probably clinging on for dear life). Today both the rat/s and dogs (as many human visitors) probably enjoy bar, cafe, and restaurant life even more because today they have smoke-free areas even in Austria.

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