Mountain Dog Leashes, 10,000Ft. Above The Competition

by Mary Haight on August 30, 2010

A leash by any other name wouldn’t be steeped in the adventurous, sometimes extreme experiences of mountain and rock climbers from all over the world. I thought about the Himalayas, and Patagonia when I opened the package.  Likely with a different leash we also would not enjoy the environmental promise that comes with each handmade recycled Mountain Dog leash.

I was really pleased when the review leash arrived – it came in a recycled envelope and was bound with a simple brown wrapper of recycled paper. 

The black and white leash I chose to review is 65” long including the handle. It’s very comfortable in the hand, and good looking, too – which for some reason I didn’t expect.  The black coloring is a sharp black, not washed out looking, and the white relief is off-white dashes rather than dots of color. It’s a very stylish effect. 

The looped handle was formed from approximately 19″ of rope and is fastened with a one piece molded resin under which there are two fasteners of indeterminate materials used to bind one end of the loop to the leash to form the handle. The snap on clip is manufactured in the USA by the last of these factories operating here.

The leash is made here without sweat-shop labor, repurposing climbing rope keeps one more thing out of landfills, the leash should last 6.73 x longer than others (there’s a study!),  no “carbon intensive recycling process” is involved(they just wash the rope in environmentally sensitive soap), and you’ve got a lifetime guarantee with this product. (Read more about the company built thanks to a Mexican street dog.)  What’s not to like? The only reservation I would have on this leash would be for use with very small dogs – the proportion of the rounded climbing rope  is too big visually for those 10# and under. And the snap-on clip is too big and heavy as well. I know that clips come in different sizes, but I’m thinking climbing rope does not come in a lesser circumference. I could be wrong, and am sure I’ll be corrected if that’s the case:)

There’s no logo on the leash; the only way people will recognize it is if they know the company already, or if you tell them. Word of mouth marketing by customers and a “business on a handshake” dealer philosophy has kept the buzz on this product humming along for the 18 months the company has been in business. The standard 6′ leash is $24.95.

You can check the retail directory on the company website, and if you don’t have a store in your area, you can order online direct from the company.

[This leash was donated to Lake Shore Animal Shelter as I think it’s perfect for dogs who pull, and many of them need a lesson or two in leash manners!]

5 comments
Mel
Mel

This leash actually looks easier to use than some of the thick braided rope ones I have seen. Thanks for bringing this company to our attention Mary!

Champion of My Heart
Champion of My Heart

That's so neat. Indeed, there aren't really many other uses for used climbing ropes. Next time we're in the market for a leash, I just might have to get one.

EdieJ
EdieJ

I don't ever want to disparage my dog's skills, but he has little, short legs and is not likely to climb any mountains. So I'm fine with the fact that there's a product that he can't use -- hey, small dogs have a fashion market monopoly -- one that works so well for his larger brethren.

K9 Coach
K9 Coach

Since my husband Gary Guller has actually reached the summit of Mt. Everest & his Yellow Lab Emmy is his favorite in the world... this leash should be a must for them :) Good stuff. Thanks for the review.

MaryHaight
MaryHaight

Thanks for stopping by, Roxanne! Yes, I just love the whole backstory to this leash, and the idea it will be the last you ever buy and that it's recycled is pretty great. I think these may make a really nice gift for a favorite shelter:)

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