FDA Says Deadly Dog Treats OK??

by Mary Haight on May 13, 2010

Here’s a report that goes to the heart of the ingredients argument we talked about the other day.  The reporter characterizes this person as a “pet nutrition expert” who advises pet food companies.  Hat tip to Jana at DawgBusiness whose tweet brought this NBC story to my attention. It appears  to be current, but often posts–especially video–will be repeated.  In any case, the information is still germane. 

This serves as another reminder that, of all the dreck that is included in your pet food that affects your pet’s health and lifespan, there’s still more!  You won’t believe the parsing here, with the FDA pretending that a toxic ingredient is not toxic just because it didn’t kill the dogs (they tested it on?) immediately as it did with the cats.  This is an $18 Billion dollar industry.  Shouldn’t customers expect excellence instead of spin?

Pet food foodies really aren’t the wild-eyed nut jobs industry and skeptics charge; there is ample reason for a campaign against this practice and all the other tainted, toxic, diseased animals that are rendered into pet food–against current law by the way.  And fairly soon now, just as with PeTA, many will be saying “who listens to the FDA anymore?”  

Do you have some of these products in your kitchen? Check your labels. And stay tuned.

An interesting aside: I noted some months ago when this revision was first announced by FDA, ASPCA had propylene glycol listed as a less toxic ingredient replacing ethylene glycol, the main ingredient in anti-freeze. But emphasis was placed on the fact that it was still toxic. It’s not there now, but it is an ingredient in some dog foods too…

Related Posts: The Fight Over Pet Food vs Pet Food Safety

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11 comments
lIZ G
lIZ G

Got up one morning and my Chihuahua mix was having what looked like a seisure and could barely walk and seemed cconfused. few days later and $250.00 at the Vet find out it was due to her new treats"Puperoini. the ingredients include propelyne glycol and onion extract. Both toxic to dogs/ BEWAre!!!!!

Crazie Eddie
Crazie Eddie

Sorry I can't believe I read this right "it didn’t kill the dogs (they tested it on?) immediately as it did with the cats"? It seems quite simple to me - if you have to test it on animals to make sure it's safe, it probably shouldn't be used. Or is that just too simple? And why, oh why, are they sacrificing animals - companion animals - in laboratories so that big business can pawn off junk food on our pets?

Marsha Mack
Marsha Mack

I agree Mary. I want to see a long term study as well. It seems there is always something new coming out in the studies that it seems almost unsafe to eat ANYTHING whether it be dog food or food for us (humans). While I stand by the fact that this problem exists with many commercial dog food brands, I won't feed into it. I stay clear....I feed my dog (Gretchen) nothing but natural organic dog food. At least I feel confident that it has no GMO grains or irradiation and is produced without any fertilizers, sewage or pesticides. It is not an easy task but the the reward of having my Gretchen healthy and know that I am giving her the best possible life, makes it all the more worth it!

Amy@GoPetFriendly
Amy@GoPetFriendly

Thanks for getting the word out about this craziness! FDA = FAIL!!!

Edie
Edie

This makes it abundantly obvious that "pet food foodies" as you term them (us!) are not some elite group who want to pamper their pets but just vigilant folks who don't want to poison them!

veryvizsla
veryvizsla

So I wikied propylene glycol b/s I wanted to know what it was used for in dog food and treats. It lead me to this interesting footnote. Veterinary data indicates that propylene glycol is toxic to dogs with a 50% chance of being lethal at doses of 9mL/kg, although the figure is higher for most laboratory animals (LD50 at levels of 20mL/kg). from THIS BOOK Peterson, Michael; Talcott, Patricia A. (2006). Small animal toxicology. St. Louis: Saunders Elsevier. pp. 997 Why would I want to give my dog something that can be lethal 50% of the time at certain concentrations? Putting propylene glycol into dog food is just wrong!

K9 Coach
K9 Coach

Thank you for posting this for pet owners to get the "real" information on these products. I have never been a fan of the the FDA's recommendations and lately it's getting really bad. When the dog bone deal came out, I was completely over it. I find it mind boggling that though there are safety issues with cooked bones, the FDA tries to take away one of the most natural things we can give a dog both as dental hygiene tool and a "behavioral toy", yet will fully endorse a toxic treat as being completely ok.

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