Antibiotic Overkill and Your Dog

by Mary Haight on August 3, 2009

Angel Eyes, a product administered daily to dogs and cats (especially the white coated) who have eye tearing that stains their faces, contains antibiotics.  Call me crazy, but hasn’t there been a global push to stop excessive/routine use of antibiotics to relieve the problem of bacterial resistance to antibiotics for many years now?  Doctors have even voiced their opposition to the sale and overuse of antibacterial agents instead of soap. Every time we turn around it seems we are creating superbugs and mutating diseases.  Now we are inflicting these problems on our dogs, perhaps unknowingly, with products like Angel Eyes.

Dr. Patricia Khuly brought up this product and the topic on Dolittler, a vet blog.  She points out that flowing tears on a dog means something medically.  Treating symptoms, and with an antibiotic without benefit of a diagnosis and prescription from a vet should be criminal. But it isn’t.  Why?  Because Angel Eyes is described by its maker as a “supplement”, and we know supplements are unregulated. In her own words:

Never mind that tears can run down faces because eyes are misshapen. Never mind that the presence of excessive lacrimation is often evidence of disease. We have a cure for what ails you, suggests Angel Eyes, the look of sickliness is all but erased by our magic pixie dust.

God forbid we should actually explore the problem behind excessive tearing and its indelible staining…lest we find that our pets are afflicted by the genetic anomalies, ophthalmic diseases and/or poor hygiene that too often lead to a feline and canine “raccoon-eyed” appearance.

But the worst part is NOT that Angel Eyes is a quick fix to a basic problem of poor ocular conformation or a variety of other ophthalmic diseases. And it’s NOT that the presence of a product like Angel Eyes allows for breeders of Maltese dogs and Persian cats, among others, to continue to breed for unhealthy deformities and disease.

The real problem? Most users of Angel Eyes have no idea what they’re offering their pets by way of aesthetic maintenance.

The next time you take your pet to the vet, if they don’t ask, tell them about all the different products and supplements you are giving your dog and/or cat.  That way they know what questions to ask, and you’ll be sure about your furry one’s true state of health.

Never mind that tears can run down faces because eyes are misshapen. Never mind that the presence of excessive lacrimation is often evidence of disease. We have a cure for what ails you, suggests Angel Eyes, the look of sickliness is all but erased by our magic pixie dust.

God forbid we should actually explore the problem behind excessive tearing and its indelible staining…lest we find that our pets are afflicted by the genetic anomalies, ophthalmic diseases and/or poor hygiene that too often lead to a feline and canine “raccoon-eyed” appearance.

But the worst part is NOT that Angel Eyes is a quick fix to a basic problem of poor ocular conformation or a variety of other ophthalmic diseases. And it’s NOT that the presence of a product like Angel Eyes allows for breeders of Maltese dogs and Persian cats, among others, to continue to breed for unhealthy deformities and disease.

The real problem? Most users of Angel Eyes have no idea what they’re offering their pets by way of aesthetic maintenance.

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6 comments
Texas Rancher
Texas Rancher

I did read it.  But I read the "actual" FDA news release on what is a strictly volunteer program.  The press release you posted is from the OTC, Organic Trade Association, Ben and jerry would be the OTC's biggest fan.  This is similar to Dr. Patty.  I read what she actually said, as opposed to what you reported  she said.

Texas Rancher
Texas Rancher

Texas rancher here.  We have both a large animal and a small animal vet and my daughter is a degreed and Certified Texas Vet Tech..  As recommended on the products label I checked with BOTH of my Vet's first.  Each said using the product as directed on the label was fine for the wife's 8 lb' Maltese.  It is obvious Mary has no medical degree or even a medical background.  For instance for adult acme a low dose of antibiotics are used for life.  In some production  cattle  and milk herds the same. That  is why Ben and Jerry's will not use this milk even though it is FDA approved.  They also have far left views on a number of subjects.

 

Sure, check with your vet, they will tell you the same as the several thousand reviews (check Amazon) the science is fine, but is you wish to introduce fringe issues almost any product can be slammed.  But I eat meat, drive a low mileage diesel dully, avid hunter and gun collector so that might disqualify  me and both Vet's compared to Mary. Even though  we all three make a living from, and accordingly, our most protected assets are our animals. 

Ann
Ann

It is concentrated Liver - falls more in the realm of Macrobiotic. It does not take near the amount as per the directions on the bottle. You can use 1/4 or less of the amount called for. This amount helps enough if you add keeping your pet clean and - trim around eyes, keep ears clean/hair free, keep teeth cleaned - professionally if needed. High concentrations of Angels Eyes can cause problems. But smaller amounts plus common sense should be ok if your pet is healthy. Little bit of liver here and there is good for every one. This red stain is over growth of yeast caused by the animals fur being wet from tearing, drinking, and some even get it on their feet (Some animals play in their water bowls) - seems one would not want too much of this on their pet either. Like noted before - use common sense. Also, if your pet is teething - this will cause more eye tearing. Tearing can clear as they grow older; especially if you help out as a responsible pet owner.

gab
gab

Although the likes of Angels Eyes use the word supplement this does not make their products legal. Tylosin is a Prescription Only Medicine, unless being used a a feed stuff for cows, pigs and poultry. Only the injectable liquid has a Marketing Authority for dog use, all other forms may only be used under the direction of a vet "off label". The claims that Angels eyes is legal because it has a small amount of Tylosin is false. The quantity is irrelevant. The product is illegal- period. The use of it without a prescription is illegal- period. The sale of it to an owner without a prescription is illegal- period. The FDA should be taking the lead here....

MaryEHaight
MaryEHaight moderator

@Texas RancherIf you had any basis of fact to present beyond your uncivil assertion that I have misquoted a respected veterinarian, which is utter nonsense as Dr Khuly would have called me on that years ago, I would give you a chance to speak your mind. Since you prefer to hide as an anonymous commenter, are adding nothing of value to the conversation, and keep going off topic, I think we will call this exchange ended.

MaryEHaight
MaryEHaight moderator

@Texas Rancher

Since all the salient points made in this post are from Veterinarian Dr Patricia Khuly, it appears your response is misdirected.

 

The FDA just came out yesterday with a plan for farmers to stop feeding their animals antibiotics as a matter of course because it's creating a major problem with the efficacy of the antibiotics available to combat human disease. You can read about it here: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/fda-starts-process-to-cut-back-antibiotic-overuse-in-livestock-235467401.html

 

I don't mind at all if you disagree with me, just provide some facts and cited data rather than assertions that arise from personal experience. I was referring to the bigger problem of overuse of antibiotics, even down to products like Angel Eyes. Thanks for stopping by =)

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