Part III The Pit Bull’s Redemption Begins at Home

by Mary Haight on May 13, 2009

JERSEY CITY, NJ - JULY 24:  A pit bull looks o...
Image by Getty Images via Daylife

A dog kept in a closet 24 hours a day, physical abuse inflicted so they become mean enough to rip apart another dog, lack of training, socialization, healthy food, water, and shelter and hundreds of other instances of neglect converge to form the basis for many Pit Bull attacks.  Media-run campaigns give Pit Bull attacks special attention, often labeling them as especially vicious time bombs ready to kill. These claims presented over and over  highlighting every Pit Bull incident, convinces the public that surely Pit Bills are genetically defective and should all be put down as dangerous dogs.

The facts are very different. Any dog subjected to repeated cruelties is a likely candidate to attack. Starvation and torture will do that to an animal.  Yes, Pit Bulls are especially athletic dogs with a powerful high pressure per square inch bite. That means people need to be responsible owners of these intelligent, loyal dogs providing for socialization, obedience training, and plenty of exercise for a healthy happy life for dog and owner.  Just ask Antonio and Anthony Pickett, who both work the streets as Anti-Dogfighting Advocates (ADA) with the End Dog Fighting program.

After two years of working the streets, and as part of the team (read Antidote to Dog Fighting and Part II End Dogfighting ) going to other cities to impart their operational model to new ADAs, the Pickett brothers are as passionate today about changing the “bad rap” Pit Bills get as the day they joined.  They work the streets, intervening as people congregate, preparing to watch or participate in a dog fight. They interrupt the process and talk about the program, how it retrains the dog and trains the owners to understand how to work with their dogs, and how it can help with vaccinations, leashes, collars and even dog food through the community outreach  program.

Hear what the Pickett brothers have to say about their work, Pit Bulls, recent attacks, and free training in the video below.  Then read on to find out how to combat dog fighting in your area. (Note: If you have trouble with the video, click HQ to change resolution)

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1 comments
Mel
Mel

So blown away by all 3 posts and the video interviews. I wish I had seen this last night and that I had known it was Pitbull Awareness Day today before I had posted my post. I would have shared yours instead. By the way, did you see that @coolcitydogs said this was covered on NPR recently? The program is going National.

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